Video Details      

ACM CSCW 1996 - Collaborative wearable system



An interdisciplimary research group at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) is investigating the design and usefulness of mobile CSCW systems for the support of distributed diagnosis, repair, and redesign of large vehicles, such as aircraft and trains. These systems incorporate diagnostic aids, on-line maintenance manuals, schematic drawings, and telecommunications that allow workers to access both stored information and interactive help from remote experts. This videotape illustrates the problem area and some wearable computer prototypes. It describes some of the field work we have done documenting the value of collaboration when workers are diagnosing and repairing complex equipment. Our laboratory experiments investigate whether wireless video capabilities are useful. One prototype incorporates both shared computer-based information (an on-line repair manual) and a shared view of the non-computerized work space (a video feed from a head-mounted camera). Experiments so far show that commumication with a remote expert improves the speed and quality of repairs, but that shared video does not. Video does, however, affect how collaborators coordinate their behavior, for example by allowing a pair to be less verbally explicit. The videotape illustrates how a collaborative pair can exploit both shared data sources to communicate more effectively.                                               
Download:
 

Video Information
Year: 1996
Genre: Educational
Keywords: CSCW; constraints; dependencies; process description; process support; workflow; computer supported cooperative work;
Duration: 00:07:49
Color: Yes
Sound: Yes
Amount of Motion: Low
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Contributing Organization: Assocation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Transcript Available: No

Digitization Information
Digitization Date: 2004
Digitizing Organization: Open Video

Search for video box
Box bottom
Related Videos box
Box bottom

The Open Video Project is managed at the Interaction Design Laboratory,
at the School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Unable to locate the log_db database at this time.