Transcript for NASA Connect - Better Health From Space To Earth

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[Lindsay:] Hi, I am Lindsay

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[inaudible] from the TV
show "Grounded for Life".

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On this episode of NASA
Connect, you will be introduced

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to the importance of good
nutrition and exercise.

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You will observe researchers and
scientists using math, science

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and technology to learn
what we can learn in space

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about our bodies here on earth.

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In your classroom you will
do cool hands on activity

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to estimate serving
sizes of different foods

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and estimate your
average daily energy needs

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and using the instructional
technology activity you'll develop

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an exercise program
for Norbert and Zot.

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So stay tune as Jennifer
Pulley takes you

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on another exciting
episode of NASA Connects,

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better health from space to earth.

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[ Music ]

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[Jennifer:] Here we go five, last
four makes you breathing, three,

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two more, two come on you can
do it last one -- there we go.

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Alright guys.

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So grab some water,
rehydrate, take five.

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[Jennifer:] Hi I am Jennifer
Pulley and welcome to NASA Connect.

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The show that connects you to
math, science, technology and NASA.

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In addition to being your
host I am also a Certified

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Aerobics Instructor.

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[RJ:] Hey!

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Jennifer that was a great
workout, but I never know I had

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so many stomach muscles.

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[Jennifer:] But we do.

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[RJ:] I hope you will
help me in my training.

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[Jennifer:] Oh!

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What do you training for?

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[RJ:] Want to try off
my cross country team

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and try also in a couple of weeks.

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[Jennifer:] RJ that is super.

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How's your training going?

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[RJ:] Well, I guess its okay,

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but I really don't have too
much energy during the day.

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[Jennifer:] Well, have you
researched what nutrients your

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body needs?

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Because then you have to estimate
and measure portions to make sure

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that the nutrients are in
there and of course you have

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to have an exercise program.

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[RJ:] Measuring, estimating
my nutritional needs

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and exercise program, not
really I think I mean okay.

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Do I look overweight?

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[Jennifer:] No, not at all; tell
me what do you eat for breakfast?

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[RJ:] I had a soda and
a glazed honey bun.

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It's better than nothing.

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[Jennifer Poly:] RJ a soda
and a glazed honey bun

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that is loaded with sugar?

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[RJ:] Yeah!

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The sugar provides me with energy.

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[Jennifer Poly:] Yeah, but that
energy doesn't last throughout the

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whole day and that's
why you get tired.

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You need something more
substantial for breakfast.

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You know what I think -- I
think that we need to reevaluate

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and improve your nutrition
and exercise program and not

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where we can get you
in tip-top shape

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for the cross country tryouts.

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[RJ:] Okay.

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[Lindsay:] Guys on today's program,
we will stress the importance

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of good nutrition and exercise.

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Especially in the adolescent
years and that's mean you.

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We will visit with NASA researchers
to tell us what we can learn

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in space about our
bodies here on earth.

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And I will offer you a challenge
at the end of the program,

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but before we talk more about
nutrition and exercise and visit

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with NASA researchers, we must
first understand the mathematical

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concepts for today's program, about
your estimation and measurement.

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During the course of the
program you will be asked

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to answer several
inquiry based questions.

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After the questions
appear on the screen,

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your teacher will pause the
program to allow you time to answer

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and discuss the questions.

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This is your time to explore
and become critical thinkers.

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Students working in
groups take a few minutes

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to answer the following questions:
Number one: What does it mean

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to measure an estimate?

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Number two: Are both math
concepts related to each other?

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Explain. Number three: Give some
examples of things that you measure

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and estimate everyday.

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Now comparing your answers
to all three questions

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with other groups in your class.

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It is now time to pause the tape.

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You know guys the math concepts
sub-measurement and estimation

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on a central part
of our daily lives.

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Let's think about things that
you measure on a daily basis.

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Well, you measure time with
watches, weight with scales

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and temperature with thermometers.

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You may think of such measurements
as exact, but the accuracy

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of a measurement depends on
the precision of the tool.

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In this sense, measurements can
be thought up as estimations.

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Now let's think about things
you estimate on a daily basis.

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Like the length of time it takes
to get ready in the morning,

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or how long you need to
walk to the bus stop,

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or how much cereal you
pour into the bowl?

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Estimation, is the
powerful mathematical idea

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that can be used both to solve
problems and to check to see

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if our results are reasonable.

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You know, in reality
things aren't always exact

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and good estimations
skills are really important

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for living successfully.

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For example,

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[Jennifer:] Norbert
here wants to see

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if the galactic fitness nine
thousand treadmill will fit

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in his spare bedroom.

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The dimensions for the base

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of the treadmill are one point
eight meters by point nine meters.

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Norbert's calculator
indicates that the base area

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of the treadmill is sixteen
point two square meters.

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Now does the base area of
sixteen point two square meters

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for a treadmill seem
reasonable to you?

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Sixteen point two square
meters square meters is

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about the size of
Norbert's bedroom.

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That would mean the galactic
fitness nine thousand is a pretty

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big treadmill; unless, you tear
down a wall good luck trying

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to squeeze the treadmill
through the door opening.

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Actually, Norbert forgot
to enter the decimal point

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in one point eight
on his calculator.

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But using mental math Norbert's
estimates suggested that the area

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of the treadmill should
be about two meters

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by one meter or two square meters.

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The actual base area

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of the treadmill is one point
sixty two square meters.

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In this case, Norbert used the
estimation technique of rounding.

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Developing methods to check the
reasonable massive results is vital

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to anyone working with
numbers especially engineers,

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scientists and researchers.

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[Lindsay:] So now you have a
good idea about the concepts

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of measurement and estimation.

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You know, this will be a
good time to pause the tape

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and review your answers

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to the three questions
I asked you earlier.

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I just want to make sure
you are on the right track.

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So how do you apply these
math concepts of estimation

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and measurements to
nutrition and exercise?

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Well, to answer this question
we must first learn what good

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nutrition is and the
benefits of regular exercise?

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[Jennifer:] Good nutrition
is critical throughout life,

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but is most important for kids.

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While the body is growing
good nutrition helps

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to insure optimal health every
cell, every organ and every system

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in the body relies
on good nutrition.

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How many times have you fallen
asleep in class after lunch?

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What do you typically
eat for lunch?

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French fries, greasy
pizza, donuts, regular soda

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or even glazed honey buns.

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If you establish good
nutritional habits

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at a young age it will help
lead to continuing these habits

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as adults and remember guys the
key to anything you eat is the eat

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in moderation that means
you don't eat an entire bag

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of chips while watching TV.

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An exercise is an integral part

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of effective weight
maintenance and weight loss.

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Exercise helps to control your
weight by using excess calories

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that otherwise would
be stored as fat.

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Regulation of body weight
is dependent on the number

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of calories you eat
and use each day.

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Balancing the calories you
use through physical activity

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with calories you eat will help
you achieve your desired weight.

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[RJ:] Now I have started to
understand the importance

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of nutrition and exercise.

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In order to stay healthy
throughout my life,

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I have to start maintaining
a good level

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of nutrition and exercise, now.

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[Jennifer:] RJ I am
so proud of you.

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You are on the right track buddy.

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And did you know that NASA has an
interest in nutrition and exercise?

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That's right, astronauts living

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on the international space station
undergo changes in their body

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that can affect the way
they function in space

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and when they return to earth.

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Think about this question,
what can we learn in space

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about our bodies here on earth?

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Also how do we apply the
math concepts of measurement

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and estimation to
nutrition and exercise?

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[ Music ]

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[Jennifer:] Good form RJ.

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Okay, well I help RJ with his
exercise and nutrition program.

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Let's go visit Dr. Scott
Smith, a nutritionist

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at NASA Johnson Space
Centre in Houston, Texas.

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Keep going RJ.

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[Dr. Scott Smith]: Thanks Jennifer,

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hi my name is Scott Smith I am
the lead for NASA's nutrition

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of our chemistry laboratory.

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Jennifer provided you with
some great back and information

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on the importance
of good nutrition.

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Based on the information
she provided,

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can you come up with the
definition for nutrition?

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What is your daily
nutritional need for calcium?

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How are you meeting that need?

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In your groups take a few
minutes to answer the questions,

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your teacher can now
pause the tapes

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so you can collaborate
with your peers.

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Nutrition is the study for the
body uses nutrients, like calories,

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vitamins and minerals, and how
much we choose nutrients the

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body needs?

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Well, good nutrition is
important for everybody.

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NASA scientists have

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[inaudible] our chemistry
laboratory,

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looking how astronauts nutrients
needs are affected by space walk.

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One area that is very important is

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about nutrition is
keeping bones healthy.

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Not eating foods that include
nutrients such as calcium

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and vitamin D can
result in weak bones.

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You can find good sources
of calcium and vitamin E

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in dairy products, such as milk
and chesses, broccoli and spinach.

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Calcium is probably the most
important nutrient when it comes

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to building strong bones.

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More than 99% of the calcium in
your body is stored in bones,

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when you don't get enough calcium
in your diet it comes out of bones

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to help the other tissues.

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If you do that long enough what
happens is the bones become weak

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and brittle, it can lead to
diseases such as osteoporosis.

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Osteoporosis is a disease where
the bones become fragile and break.

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The best way to counter act or
prevent getting osteoporosis is

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to eat well and exercise
when you are young.

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So why are we concerned about
bone loss during in space life?

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Astronaut's actually loose
bone mass during space walk.

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This is especially significant for
long missions such as the astronaut

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that serve in international
space station

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or on future missions
to other planets.

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When astronauts return from long
missions they have an increased

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risk fractures and
another health problems

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because they loose
bone mass and calcium.

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Do you have any idea,
why this occurs?

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Does that mean they get
osteoporosis while they are

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in space?

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The human body get used to operate
in an earth's gravity field.

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When humans are removed
from this environment

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as when they travel in space.

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Many complex changes take place.

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While living and working in
microgravity environment,

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your body senses that
it doesn't need

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as much bone mass
to support the body.

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So bone mass decreases
when you are return

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to earth's gravity environment,

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your body senses it needs more
bone mass to support the body.

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So bone mass will
begin to increase.

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Because it takes a long time
to regain the lost bone,

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this is the period when you have
the higher risk of bone fractures,

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because your body skeleton has a
tougher time supporting your body

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against earth's gravity.

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Here at NASA we conduct research

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to understand how much calcium
is being deposited into bones

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and how much calcium is
being taken out of bones.

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This research involves
mathematics, especially measurement

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and estimation skills.

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For example, let's take a look
at the following system diagram,

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suppose Norbert was to consume
a thousand milligrams of calcium

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which is the daily recommended
allowance in the form

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of large glass of milk.

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This diagram shows the path of
calcium and other nutrients follows

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into Norbert's body from the mouth.

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The milk enters the stomach and
is broken down into stomach

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[inaudible] tested by
chemical processes.

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Approximately, eighty percent

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of the calcium per 800 milligrams
leaves the body as solid waste.

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The remaining twenty percent
per two hundred milligrams

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of calcium enters
your blood source.

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The calcium will help many
of your body functions

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and importantly will
prevent calcium

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[inaudible] taken out of bones.

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This is what happens when we
don't have enough calcium.

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About five percent or fifty
milligrams of the remaining calcium

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that is your kidneys and is
released as liquid waste;

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some of the calcium will
be taken up in the bone

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and some will also be released by
bone back into the blood stream.

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Finally, a small percentage of
calcium flows in blood stream

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into the larger intestine
and out as solid waste.

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To estimate how much
calcium bones are absorbing,

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how much calcium is
being taken out of bones?

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We can give Norbert a tiny amount
of a special form of calcium

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for this case the blue calcium.

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Overtime usually ten to fourteen
days we collect biological samples

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of solid waste, liquid
waste and blood.

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We can determine how much calcium
regular or blue in each sample.

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By mathematically analyzing the
data we can actually estimate the

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amount of calcium
absorbed by the intestines,

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how much calcium is
filtered by the kidneys,

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how much calcium is being
deposited in the bone

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and how much calcium is
being taken out of bone.

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By studying the whole
calcium before, during,

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and after space life, we can tell
how the body is changing during

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flight and what is
happening to the calcium.

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>From our estimates we can
conclude that the amount of calcium

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that is deposited in a bone and
the amount of calcium released

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by the bone back into the
blood is about the same.

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This changes when astronauts
are in space the amount

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of calcium absorbed by the
bone is less than the amount

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of calcium released by the bone.

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Finally when astronauts return
to earth and recover over time,

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the amount of calcium deposited
in the bone and the amount

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of calcium released
by bones stabilizes

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and returns to pre-flight level.

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Understanding this
specific means of how bone

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and calcium is changed during
flight can help us figure out how

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to counter act it and also
how to prevent bone disorders

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on earth such as osteoporosis.

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So we are beginning to understand
the importance of nutrition

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and how nutrition can be
important for your health.

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Have you changed into the answers
for the question I asked earlier,

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now it would be great time to stop
the tape and review your answers.

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[Jennifer:] Thanks Scott!

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Okay guy's its time for
you to become a scientist

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and apply your estimation
and measurement skills

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with this program
Hands on Activity.

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It was developed by the
National Space Biomedical

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Research Institute.

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Hey! Let's check in on the
students at the New Mexico school

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for the Deaf in Santa
Fe New Mexico.

[00:13:56.219]
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[Speaker:] NASA Connect asked us

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to show you this program
Hands on Activities.

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The first activity is
called Serving Sizes.

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Here are the main objectives
for the first activity.

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Students you will estimate
serving sizes of different foods

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and compare their estimates to
serving size information provided

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on nutrition facts food labels.

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[Teacher:] Good morning class,

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food labels are another
guides offer new serving sizes

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to describe a recommended
single portion of food or drink.

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NASA Connect asked us

[00:14:42.269]
to investigate the question
what is the serving size?

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[Jennifer:] Your teacher
will provide you

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with the nutrition fact
labels from these food items.

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One bag of frozen piece, one
box of dry breakfast cereal,

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one bag of popcorn and a two
liter of bottle of soft drink.

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Copies of the labels are to
be distributed to groups.

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You are to determine
appropriate serving sizes

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for the different foods,
right the word estimate

[00:15:09.279]
onto three paper plates
and on to one cup.

[00:15:12.809]
Mark the other three paper
plates and cup as food label.

[00:15:16.859]
On the student handout
write the name of each food

[00:15:20.189]
under the food name column.

[00:15:23.139]
For each food estimate how many
cups or fractions of cups make

[00:15:28.189]
up one serving size, record your
estimate in the second column

[00:15:32.619]
of the table and measure
the portion

[00:15:34.639]
into the estimate plates and cup.

[00:15:37.369]
Next, measure on to the food label
plate and cup the serving size

[00:15:41.659]
for each food based on
the nutrition fact label.

[00:15:45.839]
You are then to write a
short paragraph answering the

[00:15:48.349]
activities discussion questions.

[00:15:50.989]
If you have access to personal
digital assistance so PDA's,

[00:15:55.389]
the PDA is a great device
for keeping a journal.

[00:15:58.339]
You can use the infrared
capabilities

[00:16:00.409]
to peer edit journal
entries with others.

[00:16:03.429]
[00:16:04.939]
[Teacher:] Later in
this show our students

[00:16:06.949]
up in the New Mexico School

[00:16:08.129]
for the Deaf will show you the
second activity called your energy

[00:16:12.489]
needs; back to you Jennifer.

[00:16:16.259]
[Jennifer:] Now let's focus
our attention on exercise.

[00:16:19.409]
You know exercise and
nutrition go hand in hand.

[00:16:22.459]
Doctor Don Hagen, the exercise
lead in the Human Adaptations

[00:16:26.369]
and Counter Measures office.

[00:16:27.679]
At NASA Johnson Space
Centre can tell us more.

[00:16:32.159]
[Don Hagen:] Hello,
Jennifer is correct.

[00:16:34.119]
Good nutrition and
exercise are interconnected.

[00:16:37.699]
My job is the exercise lead
in the Human Adaptation

[00:16:41.079]
and Counter Measures office here
at the Johnson's Space Centre is

[00:16:44.699]
to work with the team of specialist

[00:16:47.229]
to determinate exercise
requirements for astronauts

[00:16:50.459]
and long-duration space life.

[00:16:52.399]
A long-durations space life
can be anywhere from months

[00:16:55.959]
on the international
space station to years

[00:16:58.899]
that we ever traveled
to other planets.

[00:17:01.409]
Before I continue, let's take a
look at the following questions.

[00:17:05.589]
Why is it important for
astronauts to exercise in space?

[00:17:10.039]
[00:17:11.179]
Do astronauts have
to be elite athletes

[00:17:13.659]
to endure a long duration
space life, explain?

[00:17:17.959]
What are some of the ways you
measure your level of fitness?

[00:17:21.689]
Students as your teacher pauses
the program take a few minutes

[00:17:26.039]
to answer and discuss the
questions with your class.

[00:17:29.859]
When astronauts work

[00:17:31.039]
in the international space
station they are working

[00:17:34.419]
in a microgravity environment.

[00:17:36.909]
They appear to be
floating in the ISS.

[00:17:39.869]
The apparent weightless
environment places are reduced low

[00:17:44.119]
on the leg and back muscles.

[00:17:46.509]
Astronauts hardly use
the leg muscles in space.

[00:17:49.659]
The lack of muscles activity
can cause the muscles

[00:17:53.059]
to weaken or reduce in size.

[00:17:55.679]
We call this muscle apathy.

[00:17:57.829]
It is possible astronauts
on long missions may loose

[00:18:02.009]
up to twenty five percent

[00:18:03.499]
of the muscles mass
while working in space.

[00:18:05.739]
The loss of muscle mass

[00:18:07.749]
and strength during these missions
could pose dramatic problems

[00:18:11.779]
when they return to earth.

[00:18:13.779]
Muscles support to bones in the
body and if you have a combination

[00:18:17.709]
of weak muscles and weak bones can
you imagine the harmful effects

[00:18:21.929]
your body could face?

[00:18:23.769]
To prevent muscle
atrophy astronauts must be

[00:18:26.709]
in good physical condition, while
here on earth for working in space.

[00:18:31.609]
Do astronauts need
to be elite athletes?

[00:18:34.429]
There are no physical requirements
for the astronauts other

[00:18:37.889]
than you have to be healthy and
pass a physical examination.

[00:18:41.829]
Astronauts perform physical
conditioning on a regular basis

[00:18:45.539]
as part of their training.

[00:18:47.379]
This also applies to them when
they are working in space.

[00:18:51.069]
The NASA team is responsible
for pre-flight, end-flight

[00:18:56.119]
and post-flight exercise
performance testing

[00:18:58.859]
for all astronauts.

[00:19:00.299]
We want to make sure astronauts
are in good shape before they go

[00:19:04.179]
into space, lose the least amount
of muscle mass while in space

[00:19:09.179]
and rehabilitate their whole
body when they return from space.

[00:19:13.319]
We can conduct research and
measure the muscles performance

[00:19:16.609]
of astronauts by simulating an
apparent weightlessness environment

[00:19:21.409]
here on earth.

[00:19:23.109]
Any ideas on how we can do that?

[00:19:25.459]
Exposure to space life is very
similar to prolonged bed rest;

[00:19:30.799]
remember a cause of muscle atrophy

[00:19:33.389]
in space is lack of
muscular activity.

[00:19:36.899]
That's why bed rest is a good model
because it minimizes activity.

[00:19:40.859]
And like astronauts, you loose
muscle mass primarily in the legs.

[00:19:45.969]
During prolonged bed rest
the body gradually degrades

[00:19:50.509]
and loses muscle mass, bone
mass and endurance capacity.

[00:19:54.889]
Let's look at an example of how
we measure muscle performance?

[00:19:59.619]
Suppose we use Norbert as
our test subject and want

[00:20:02.929]
to measure his exercise power
output during pre-flight,

[00:20:07.069]
in-flight and post-flight.

[00:20:09.329]
In pre-flight, we would first have
Norbert use a resistance device

[00:20:13.229]
to measures his leg power.

[00:20:15.429]
As you can see in the animation,
Norbert's legs are pretty strong.

[00:20:20.079]
He was able to lift one
hundred kilograms ten times.

[00:20:24.079]
Next, we simulate in-flight
testing by putting Norbert in bed

[00:20:28.729]
for an extended period
of time say twenty days.

[00:20:32.499]
During that period Norbert conducts
all his activities in bed except

[00:20:37.009]
for using the rest room.

[00:20:38.479]
On day twenty, we measure
his leg power again.

[00:20:42.819]
While in bed he is in the
same resistive device and see

[00:20:47.049]
that Norbert can only lift
seventy-five kilograms ten times.

[00:20:51.609]
What percent decrease in
leg power did Norbert loose

[00:20:55.249]
over the twenty days?

[00:20:56.949]
If you say twenty-five
percent then you are right.

[00:21:00.269]
After twenty days Norbert
is removed from the bed

[00:21:03.689]
and the rehabilitation process
begins to rebuild his leg muscles.

[00:21:07.849]
This is considered post-flight.

[00:21:10.229]
He undergoes an exercise
program that will allow him

[00:21:13.559]
to regain the strength
he lost in his legs.

[00:21:16.399]
I am sure glad he purchased up the

[00:21:18.719]
[inaudible] fitness nine
thousands treadmill.

[00:21:21.089]
In reality, the recovery process
is different for most astronauts.

[00:21:25.909]
It takes about thirty
days for muscles strength

[00:21:28.429]
and exercise capacity
to return to normal,

[00:21:31.709]
but bone density may
takes six months

[00:21:34.029]
to a year to return to normal.

[00:21:36.169]
The research we conduct
in space and here

[00:21:38.799]
on earth may one day benefit many
populations such as the elderly

[00:21:44.089]
or people who have
had major operations

[00:21:47.209]
and are subjected to
extended bed rest.

[00:21:50.839]
The important thing for you is that
exercise and good nutrition help

[00:21:55.289]
to build strong muscles,
bones, and endorse capacity

[00:21:59.759]
and that both are needed
throughout your life in order

[00:22:02.889]
to optimize your health
and thus for longer life.

[00:22:06.339]
Well, Jennifer back to you

[00:22:08.109]
and by the way how's
your friend's exercise

[00:22:10.779]
and nutrition program coming along.

[00:22:13.969]
[Jennifer:] Well, I think RJ
really understands the importance

[00:22:17.399]
of good nutrition and exercise
and if they go hand-in-hand

[00:22:20.429]
to maintain good health overall.

[00:22:22.399]
At the beginning of the program
do you remember RJ saying

[00:22:26.329]
that his energy level
was pretty low?

[00:22:28.669]
Well, energy fuels growth,
movement and all the process is

[00:22:32.409]
in every cell inside
the human body.

[00:22:36.029]
You know now is the good time
to go back and visit our friends

[00:22:38.839]
at the New Mexico's
School for the Deaf

[00:22:41.059]
to see how they are coming along

[00:22:42.239]
on their second activity
your energy needs

[00:22:44.649]
and how it applies to RJ's workout.

[00:22:48.249]
[Teacher:] In this activity,

[00:22:49.489]
you will estimate your
average daily energy needs.

[00:22:53.269]
[00:22:55.489]
We measure energy in calories.

[00:23:01.479]
Help RJ figure out
his energy needs.

[00:23:05.319]
You have to calculate his
baseline calorie need,

[00:23:09.699]
also called basal
metabolic rate or BMR.

[00:23:16.449]
BMR is estimated based on
gender, age, height, and weight.

[00:23:25.359]
[Jennifer:] You will work from
the baseline energy needs hand out

[00:23:28.789]
and the total energy needs
hand out which can be found

[00:23:32.269]
in the educator's guide.

[00:23:34.079]
The BMR value for men
well, in this case,

[00:23:36.849]
RJ can be calculated using
the following equation

[00:23:41.339]
where 'W' is the weight in
kilograms, 'H' is the height

[00:23:45.289]
in centimeter and 'A' is RJ's age.

[00:23:47.709]
The BMR equation for women
is different than men

[00:23:52.689]
but it also based on
weight, height and age.

[00:23:56.219]
By substituting RJ's weight, height
and age into the BMR equation,

[00:24:01.469]
the student's estimated
RJ's BMR value

[00:24:04.259]
to be one thousand six
hundred forty-five.

[00:24:07.029]
This is his baseline energy need.

[00:24:09.949]
Now if we factor in his exercise
level the baseline value needs

[00:24:14.339]
to be adjusted, because
RJ is trying

[00:24:17.019]
out for the cross country team,
his exercise level should be high,

[00:24:20.779]
meaning he is using
a lot of energy.

[00:24:23.959]
From the total energy needs hand
out we can adjust RJ's BMR value

[00:24:29.069]
by multiplying one thousand
six hundred forty-five

[00:24:31.729]
and one point nine.

[00:24:33.569]
The exercise level adjustments
are found in the handout.

[00:24:37.119]
It looks like the total
estimated energy needs

[00:24:39.839]
for RJ is three thousand one
hundred twenty-five calories

[00:24:48.659]
per day.

[00:24:49.539]
[Speaker:] Good luck to you RJ.

[00:24:51.909]
[ Music ]

[00:24:51.909]
[Jennifer:] Good job.

[00:24:52.559]
RJ is certainly on his way to
improving his exercise program,

[00:24:56.559]
and now it's your turn to develop

[00:24:58.319]
in exercise program
for Norbert and Zot.

[00:25:00.999]
The students at Princess and
Middle School in Virginia Beach,

[00:25:03.979]
Virginia will show you
this program web activity.

[00:25:07.419]
[Speaker:] There are two
parts to the web activity.

[00:25:09.779]
In the first part, called
the exercise project, Norbert

[00:25:13.089]
and Zot are on their galactic
fitness nine thousand treadmills.

[00:25:17.109]
Their doctor and trainer
have asked them

[00:25:19.269]
to exercise sixty minutes a day
and maintain an average heart rate

[00:25:23.589]
of one hundred beats per minute.

[00:25:25.749]
Their doctor has divided
their sixty minutes

[00:25:28.049]
into six ten minute periods

[00:25:30.189]
with a constant heart
rate during each period.

[00:25:33.149]
Your first job is to pick heart
rate targets for each segment,

[00:25:36.779]
to make their average come to
one hundred beats per minute.

[00:25:40.699]
Then you become the trainer and
pick a good exercise plan for them

[00:25:44.479]
and estimate their average
heart rate as per your plan.

[00:25:47.739]
In the second part
of the web activity,

[00:25:49.619]
call the heart plot project.

[00:25:51.539]
You need to measure and record
data on your own heart rate.

[00:25:55.089]
Plot your data using the
squeak heart plotter.

[00:25:58.259]
By analyzing the data
on your plots,

[00:26:00.669]
you will see how your heart
rate changes as you exercise.

[00:26:04.149]
[Jennifer:] Now it's your
turn to take nutrition

[00:26:07.569]
and exercise challenge brought you

[00:26:09.369]
by the National Space
Biomedical Research Institute.

[00:26:12.519]
Working in groups
you will choose one

[00:26:14.669]
of seven specialty menu
cards select from a person

[00:26:18.439]
with hypertension, a strict
vegetarian, a pregnant women,

[00:26:23.599]
a person who is an lactose
intolerance, a diabetic and athlete

[00:26:28.919]
in training or an
astronauts in space.

[00:26:32.779]
You will plan a menu for
breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks

[00:26:37.219]
that needs the particular
dietary needs described

[00:26:39.899]
on a specialty menu card.

[00:26:41.399]
You will also create
an exercise program

[00:26:43.189]
for this specialty
menu card you choose.

[00:26:45.599]
The instructions and
materials can be downloaded

[00:26:48.129]
from the NASA Connect website.

[00:26:50.049]
Then submit your nutrition
plan and exercise program

[00:26:54.069]
to the NASA Connect website.

[00:26:55.779]
There is a good chance that your
plan and program will be seen

[00:26:59.509]
by millions of students
across the country.

[00:27:02.119]
[Lindsey:] Well guys that wrap up
another episode of NASA connect.

[00:27:04.559]
We would like to thank everyone,

[00:27:06.069]
who help to make this
program possible

[00:27:08.359]
and you know RJ is doing
fantastic with his fitness

[00:27:11.799]
and nutrition program and we are
going to keep our fingers crossed

[00:27:14.499]
when he makes to the
cross country team.

[00:27:16.459]
As per us at NASA we help that
you will consider how to improve

[00:27:20.429]
and maintain your good health.

[00:27:23.239]
Got a comment.

[00:27:24.339]
question or suggestion?

[00:27:26.089]
Well then email them to
connect@larc.nasa.gov or pick

[00:27:31.639]
up a pen and mail
them to NASA Connect.

[00:27:34.689]
NASA Langley Center
for Distance Learning,

[00:27:36.879]
NASA Langley Research Center
mail stop four hundred,

[00:27:40.069]
Hampton, Virginia, 23681.

[00:27:43.199]
So, until next time stay connected
to math, science, technology

[00:27:48.049]
and NASA, it's your
health, see you then.

[00:27:50.919]